Quote
"Bad books on writing tell you to ‘WRITE WHAT YOU KNOW’, a solemn and totally false adage that is the reason there exist so many mediocre novels about English professors contemplating adultery."

— Joe Haldeman

(Source: maxkirin, via mxzart)

Quote
"'Men have courage—one knows that,' said Miss Waynflete, 'but they are more easily deceived than women.'"

Murder is Easy by Agatha Christie.

Photo

"No, no, my dear boy, that’s where you’re wrong. It’s very easy to kill—so long as no one suspects you.”

"No, no, my dear boy, that’s where you’re wrong. It’s very easy to killso long as no one suspects you.”

Quote
"All the things I’d previously loved, adored, shed tears over because of their simple and irreplaceable and unrepeatable beauty, were just a bit too real and vile for me to be able to handle them. The Louisiana soil would soon envelop my father’s corpse and make it rot, and he would be in that so irksome of worlds of which all the literature in the history of mankind cannot soften the blow; that death."

—  Polo, Part Two, Chapter 5. (via polo-a-novel)

Photo
shitfrasiersays:

Eddie the Biscuit Whore

shitfrasiersays:

Eddie the Biscuit Whore

Tags: Frasier
Text

thespanishdog:

I wish Arthur could give me a quarterly review, so I’d know if I’m doing all right. 

Quote
"Alas! a woman that attempts the pen,
Such an intruder on the rights of men,
Such a presumptuous creature, is esteemed,
The fault can by no virtue be redeemed.
They tell us we mistake our sex and way;
Good breeding, fashion, dancing, dressing, play
Are the accomplishments we should desire;
To write, or read, or think, or to inquire
Would cloud our beauty, and exhaust our time,
And interrupt the conquests of our prime;
Whilst the dull manage of a servile house
Is held by some our outmost art, and use."

— Anne Finch, Countess of Winchilsea, "The Introduction".

Video

Flake - Jack Johnson

Photo


In 1957, writer Jack Kerouac described Dean as an example of a new kind of man “of exceptional masculine beauty and compassion and sadness,” a “new American hero” free of “the barriers of ancient anti-womanism.” As Jim Stark, Dean represented a fresh truth, and his honesty and expansiveness clearly elicited a passionate response.

In 1957, writer Jack Kerouac described Dean as an example of a new kind of man “of exceptional masculine beauty and compassion and sadness,” a “new American hero” free of “the barriers of ancient anti-womanism.” As Jim Stark, Dean represented a fresh truth, and his honesty and expansiveness clearly elicited a passionate response.

(Source: jamesdeandaily, via jamesdeandaily)

Quote
"That’s really what adulthood is like most of the time. You know you spend a lot of time walking back to the room to get the thing that you left the room so that you would go and use it somewhere else and you’re on your way back to the room to get the thing you forget not only what it is but what room it was in, and you’re faced with the people who love you looking at you, going, “What d’you want? Why are you here?”, and you go, “I don’t know.” You spend an awful lot of time like that. And children aren’t like that. Which is why they look so young, because they always have a sense of style and purpose. When they’re walking around they have a very definite purpose. And it’s a great walk as well, it’s not an adult sort of bemused shuffle, it’s that, “I’m going over here,” you say, “Why are you going over there?” “‘Cause I have a harmonica.” “What are you doing with a harmonica?” “I’m going to put it in the toilet.” “Why are you doing that?” “ENOUGH QUESTIONS, GOODBYE.”"

Dylan Moran, Like, Totally.